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Posts Tagged ‘Hairy Woodpecker’

After breakfast and a little birding around Guayabo Lodge on the morning of December 12, we headed up a steep and mostly unpaved road towards Irazu Volcano.  We hoped to get a view down into the volcano crater and also see some high-elevation birds.  But when we reached the entrance to the national park, the cloud cover was so thick that we could barely see the road.  It didn’t make sense to spend time there, so we slowly started towards Savegre Hotel Natural Reserve & Spa in the Savegre Valley.

After a couple of quick stops for birding along the way, we arrived at our hotel mid-afternoon.  We were thrilled to see two Long-tailed Silky-flycatchers before we even checked in.

Long-tailed Silky-flycatcher

Long-tailed Silky-flycatcher

The accommodations on this trip were all excellent with Savegre Hotel being the best.  The only other place I’ve ever stayed on a birding trip that was as nice was Tiger Camp in India.  I quickly got settled in my room and then went out to meet Paul for a little pre-dinner birding.

Within minutes I had another life bird right outside my room, a Slaty Flowerpiercer.  These birds live on a diet of insects and nectar.  A flowerpiercer will perch on a branch or flower stalk and pierce the base of the flower with its hooked bill.  It then extracts the flower’s nectar with its tongue.  The bird “cheats” by obtaining sweet nectar without providing any pollination services to the plant.

Slaty Flowerpiercer

Slaty Flowerpiercer

After a wonderful dinner at the hotel restaurant, we headed back towards our rooms.  We were stopped in our tracks when we saw this gorgeous snake right in front of us.  Paul immediately knew that it was something rare and special, but all of us could see that it was incredibly beautiful.  After taking a few photos, I went on to my room.  Later I learned that it was rare and special indeed – a Talamancan Palm-pitviper which was just discovered in 2016.

Talamancan palm-pitviper, Bothriechis nubestris

Talamancan palm-pitviper, Bothriechis nubestris

The following morning we met our guide, Marino, shortly after 5:00 AM to look for Resplendent Quetzal.  We slowly drove down the road from the lodge and soon saw a large crowd.  Many cars were parked on the side of the road and birders were watching the trees with binoculars, scopes, and cameras.  Knowing that they must be watching a quetzal, we parked, too, and soon saw our target bird in the trees.  Marino had me follow him as he quickly moved from one spot to another to get the best views.  Over the next few minutes we saw a total of three Resplendent Quetzals – a very exciting start to the day.

We saw many birds with Marino that morning.  Some of my favorites were the Golden-browed Chlorophonias we watched in a little apple orchard.  We had good looks with the scope, but I wanted to get closer, so Marino climbed up the hill with me – carrying a heavy scope – and made sure that I got good looks and photos of the birds.

Golden-browed Chlorophonia

Golden-browed Chlorophonia

We also saw a Scintillant Hummingbird on her nest, Sulphur-winged Parakeets, Spot-crowned Woodcreeper, Black-faced Solitaire, and too many others to list. The hotel grounds were beautiful and included this lovely pond and garden.

Garden at Savegre Hotel

Garden at Savegre Hotel

Lunch was at the famous Miriam’s Restaurant, a favorite with birders because of the amazing feeders behind the deck in addition to excellent food (especially the fresh mountain trout, which I had both days we ate there).  The next four photos were all taken at Miriam’s that day.

Scintillant Hummingbird

Scintillant Hummingbird

 

Flame-colored Tanager

Flame-colored Tanager

 

Acorn Woodpecker

Acorn Woodpecker

I counted six Acorn Woodpeckers at Miriam’s that day and could easily have missed some.  Everyone enjoyed watching these colorful woodpeckers with the clown face, but what really attracted attention was this little Hairy Woodpecker.  It appeared much smaller and darker than the birds we see at home.  There are 17 subspecies of Hairy Woodpecker with significant variation across their wide geographic range.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Next we went to Batsu Gardens, a favorite spot for photographers.  I shot the Silver-throated Tanager below at the area set up for photos.

Silver-throated Tanager

Silver-throated Tanager

I also photographed this Tennessee Warbler at that spot.  Although it’s a familiar bird that I see at home, this may be my favorite photo of the entire trip.

Tennessee Warbler

Tennessee Warbler

Tufted Flycatcher was one of the life birds that I got at Batsu Gardens.  There were two individuals and they could not have been more cooperative as they returned to their favorite perches time and again after sallying out for insects.

Tufted Flycatcher

Tufted Flycatcher

On our final full day, we started by heading to the mountain at the top of Savegre Valley, Cerro de la Muerte (“Hill of Death”).  Several species of birds can only be found in the paramo at the top above the tree line.  And, most of those birds are skulty and challenging to see, especially for me with my crappy vision.  So, I missed a couple of species, but with persistence and Paul’s help, I did finally get a look at a Peg-billed Finch.  No one has ever worked harder than Paul did to help me see difficult birds.  The Volcano Juncos were more numerous and cooperative.

Volcano Junco

Volcano Junco

It was back to Miriam’s for another fabulous trout lunch and more time at the magic feeders.

Talamanca Hummingbird

Talamanca Hummingbird

This afternoon we had two toucanets, one of my favorite birds.

Northern Emerald-Toucanet

Northern Emerald-Toucanet

The Yellow-thighed Brushfinch kindly showed off his thighs!

Yellow-thighed Brushfinch

Yellow-thighed Brushfinch

The most exciting moment was when a breathtaking male Resplendent Quetzal few in to the trees behind the feeder area.  We shared this wonderful experience with a few other birders who were there.  I enjoyed talking with Mike Canzoneri, an American living in Costa Rica, and I was standing beside him when we saw the quetzal.  Mike generously shared the photo that he took that afternoon and gave me his permission to use it in this post.

Resplendent Quetzal. Photo by Mike Canzoneri.

Resplendent Quetzal. Photo by Mike Canzoneri.

I could have stayed at Miriam’s forever, so when the others left to go shopping at a local indigenous craft store, I stayed for more birds.  I saw a few that I had not seen the previous day and also enjoyed better looks at some of the same birds.  You can actually see the big feet on the Large-footed Finch in this photo.

Large-footed Finch

Large-footed Finch

Finally, I had to say goodbye to Miriam’s and we started back to the hotel. We made a stop at another craft store; Paul and I birded instead of shopping.  We were rewarded with great looks at two Spangle-cheeked Tanagers, a bird that I had missed earlier and very much wanted to see.  This species can only be found in Costa Rica and western Panama.

Spangle-cheeked Tanager

Spangle-cheeked Tanager

The next morning, December 15, it was time to head to the airport for our flights home.  What a trip!  Incredible scenery, birds, snakes and other wildlife, wonderful food and lodging, and excellent guiding – the Epic Nature Tours trip led by Paul and Amanda was a wonderful success.  I can’t wait to go back again!

Left to Right: Paul, Amanda, "Resplendent Quetzal", Diane, Shelley

Left to Right: Paul, Amanda, “Resplendent Quetzal”, Diane, Shelley

More of my photos can be seen in eBird Costa Rica 2019:

 

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After two big days of birding with Joan Collins, we were all ready for a leisurely morning.  Saturday we slept in a little, got organized, and loaded up both cars.  Then we went back to the Bloomingdale Bog feeders.  Derek and I had fun when we were there a few days earlier and we wanted to share that experience with David.  It was nearly noon when we got there, but it seemed to be good timing.  As we walked down the short trail to the feeders, David commented that the large open bog must be good for raptors.  And sure enough that appeared to be a cue for four American Kestrels to make an appearance and fly from one tall snag to another over the bog.

Next it was the Hairy Woodpecker show.  A nice male flew at eye level from from one tree to another in the feeding area for around ten minutes.  None of us had ever had closer looks.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

And then it was time for the main event – feeding the Canada Jays.  I went first and was thrilled with the feeling of the bird on my hand.  The photo below shows how happy it made me.

David was next.  Later he confessed that he wasn’t really all that interested until he saw my face when a Jay was on my hand.  He loved it, too.  He said of the jay, “He looked me in the eye.”  And, one of David’s birds chirped after every raisin “as if saying ‘Thank you’.”  David also noted that one jay stuffed five raisins in his beak at one time.

David makes friends with a Canada Jay. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

David makes friends with a Canada Jay. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

The Canada Jay was called Gray Jay for many years until last year when its name was officially changed back to Canada Jay, the name that the bird had gone by from at least 1831 to 1957.  The bird’s nicknames are more interesting, though.  “Camp Robber” is given because they frequently visit campsites for a handout and have even been known to enter tents looking for food.  “Whiskey Jack” is a name that likely stems from the Cree wisikejack or wisakedjak.

The jay is associated with mythological figures of several First Nations cultures.  But it’s to the Cree peoples especially that Wisakedjak is a shape-shifter who frequently appears as the Canada Jay, a benign spirit, fun-loving and cheerful.  The bird is seen in Cree stories as an example of good manners and good company.

A Canada Jay on David's hand. Note how his feet wrap around David's fingers. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

A Canada Jay on David’s hand. Note how his feet wrap around David’s fingers. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

Canada Jays are also fascinating in their breeding behavior.  Pairs are monogamous and remain together for life.  These hardy birds live year round in the north, mostly in Canada.  During warmer months, they gather and store food for the harsh winter to come.  Nesting starts in late winter; both males and females work hard to build a nest that is well-insulated.  Eggs are laid in late February or March and the female stays on the nest while incubating eggs and brooding young chicks while the male brings food to the nest.

All done. A Canada Jay flies off David's hand. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

All done. A Canada Jay flies off David’s hand. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

Derek had a turn and then we walked the short distance back to the car.  We drove to Ticonderoga that afternoon where David would start Cycle Adirondack’s Ultimate Cycling Vacation on Sunday.  David went to the welcome dinner while Derek and I headed out for one last birding adventure before he would have to start home.  Derek had 97 Vermont birds and we both wanted him to get three more.  He had picked out a great birding location in Vermont, West Rutland Marsh, but it was raining and we did not get the reprieve that was predicted.  Not wanting to admit defeat, Derek dashed out in the rain for just a moment before deciding that the thunder was closer than desired.  So, our last birding effort was a bust, but we had a nice dinner at a cute little diner and got House Sparrow for our Vermont lists while parking.

West Rutland Marsh. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

West Rutland Marsh. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

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It was wonderful to go birding in Minnesota again, a state that has now given me 17 life birds and some great adventures.  I shared the trip with Diane Hoese, who I met birding in South Dakota with Doug Buri and Bob Janssen in 2010.  Diane provided the inspiration for this blog; my first post was about attending Bob and Doug’s Shorebird Workshop with her.  We both love learning from Bob, so we planned this trip around his Boreal Birding Workshop at the North House Folk School in Grand Marais.

High Falls on the Pigeon River.  Grand Portage State Park.

High Falls on the Pigeon River.  Grand Portage State Park.

Bob’s workshop took us to Judge CR Magney and Grand Portage state parks, Oberg Mountain, and nearby areas where we had great close-up views of 14 species of warblers.

Olive-sided Flycatcher

Olive-sided Flycatcher.  Cook County, MN.

We drove up the nearby Gunflint Trail by ourselves and found a few more birds, including this Olive-sided Flycatcher.  This bird had huge white tufts on its lower back.  Back home, I searched extensively and could not find any reference to a connection between the size of the tufts and gender, breeding status, or time of year.

Diane, Bob Janssen, Shelley

Diane, Bob Janssen, Shelley.  Grand Marais, MN.

After birding with Bob for two days, Diane and I set off to Ely to bird on our own for a day.  The highlight there was breeding Cape May Warblers on territory.  We found at least three pairs on our own, without playing recorded songs to draw the birds in, and enjoyed the peace of the boreal forest.  The birds behaved as if we weren’t even there – males singing from the treetops, a lovely female working a spruce tree at nearly eye level.  For me, birding does not get any better.

Broad-winged Hawk

Broad-winged Hawk. Echo Trail, Ely, MN.

We also watched this Broad-winged Hawk attempt to catch an afternoon snack, but he missed his prey. Earlier in the day, we had watched a different Broad-winged being harassed by Blue Jays.

Juvenile Gray Jay

Juvenile Gray Jay. Lake County Road 2, MN.

On our way south to Duluth the next day, we found a family of Gray Jays along Lake County Road 2, one adult and at least two adorable juveniles.

Next was birding with Erik Bruhnke in Sax Zim Bog.  I had hoped to see a Connecticut Warbler, but it wasn’t meant to be.  We did find a Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, though, which was one of my two life birds of the trip (the other was Alder Flycatcher).  It was a lovely day that started with great views of a LeConte’s Sparrow and this goofy looking Sharp-tailed Grouse.

Sharp-tailed Grouse. Sax Zim Bog, MN.

Sharp-tailed Grouse. Sax Zim Bog, MN.

American Kestrel.  Sax Zim Bog, MN.

American Kestrel (male). Sax Zim Bog, MN.

Erik showed me his beautiful photo of a male American Kestrel we had just watched together.  He pointed out the white outer tail feathers with black bars.  When I got home, I realized that I had also captured a clear shot of the bird’s tail showing this common trait that I’d never noticed before.

After a great dinner at Fitger’s in Duluth, we sadly sad goodbye to Erik and headed towards Diane’s home the next morning.

Shelley, Erik Bruhnke, Diane

Shelley, Erik Bruhnke, Diane. Duluth, MN.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker. Carver County, MN.

It was late afternoon and lightly raining when we arrived, but the birds were still coming to the feeders on Diane’s deck.  I was happy to capture a shot of this male Hairy Woodpecker showing a characteristic that is usually not mentioned in field guides – the vertical black line through the red patch on the back of the head.  Downy Woodpeckers do not have a line through the red patch.

My last birds of the trip were Diane’s lovely Baltimore Orioles.

Baltimore Oriole (male).  Carver County, MN.

Baltimore Oriole (male). Carver County, MN.

Baltimore Oriole (female).  Carver County, MN.

Baltimore Oriole (female). Carver County, MN.

Once again I had unintentionally taken the advice of my late husband, Burt.  I’d saved something for next time.  Now I’ve got both Connecticut Warbler and Boreal Owl to search for again.  After a wonderful trip like this, the idea of going birding again in Minnesota sounds pretty good.

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