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Posts Tagged ‘Bloomingdale Bog’

After two big days of birding with Joan Collins, we were all ready for a leisurely morning.  Saturday we slept in a little, got organized, and loaded up both cars.  Then we went back to the Bloomingdale Bog feeders.  Derek and I had fun when we were there a few days earlier and we wanted to share that experience with David.  It was nearly noon when we got there, but it seemed to be good timing.  As we walked down the short trail to the feeders, David commented that the large open bog must be good for raptors.  And sure enough that appeared to be a cue for four American Kestrels to make an appearance and fly from one tall snag to another over the bog.

Next it was the Hairy Woodpecker show.  A nice male flew at eye level from from one tree to another in the feeding area for around ten minutes.  None of us had ever had closer looks.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

And then it was time for the main event – feeding the Canada Jays.  I went first and was thrilled with the feeling of the bird on my hand.  The photo below shows how happy it made me.

David was next.  Later he confessed that he wasn’t really all that interested until he saw my face when a Jay was on my hand.  He loved it, too.  He said of the jay, “He looked me in the eye.”  And, one of David’s birds chirped after every raisin “as if saying ‘Thank you’.”  David also noted that one jay stuffed five raisins in his beak at one time.

David makes friends with a Canada Jay. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

David makes friends with a Canada Jay. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

The Canada Jay was called Gray Jay for many years until last year when its name was officially changed back to Canada Jay, the name that the bird had gone by from at least 1831 to 1957.  The bird’s nicknames are more interesting, though.  “Camp Robber” is given because they frequently visit campsites for a handout and have even been known to enter tents looking for food.  “Whiskey Jack” is a name that likely stems from the Cree wisikejack or wisakedjak.

The jay is associated with mythological figures of several First Nations cultures.  But it’s to the Cree peoples especially that Wisakedjak is a shape-shifter who frequently appears as the Canada Jay, a benign spirit, fun-loving and cheerful.  The bird is seen in Cree stories as an example of good manners and good company.

A Canada Jay on David's hand. Note how his feet wrap around David's fingers. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

A Canada Jay on David’s hand. Note how his feet wrap around David’s fingers. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

Canada Jays are also fascinating in their breeding behavior.  Pairs are monogamous and remain together for life.  These hardy birds live year round in the north, mostly in Canada.  During warmer months, they gather and store food for the harsh winter to come.  Nesting starts in late winter; both males and females work hard to build a nest that is well-insulated.  Eggs are laid in late February or March and the female stays on the nest while incubating eggs and brooding young chicks while the male brings food to the nest.

All done. A Canada Jay flies off David's hand. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

All done. A Canada Jay flies off David’s hand. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

Derek had a turn and then we walked the short distance back to the car.  We drove to Ticonderoga that afternoon where David would start Cycle Adirondack’s Ultimate Cycling Vacation on Sunday.  David went to the welcome dinner while Derek and I headed out for one last birding adventure before he would have to start home.  Derek had 97 Vermont birds and we both wanted him to get three more.  He had picked out a great birding location in Vermont, West Rutland Marsh, but it was raining and we did not get the reprieve that was predicted.  Not wanting to admit defeat, Derek dashed out in the rain for just a moment before deciding that the thunder was closer than desired.  So, our last birding effort was a bust, but we had a nice dinner at a cute little diner and got House Sparrow for our Vermont lists while parking.

West Rutland Marsh. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

West Rutland Marsh. Photo by Derek Hudgins.

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Black-backed Woodpecker is one of the most highly desired birds in the Adirondacks.  These woodpeckers are boreal specialists with most of their range in Canada.  They feed mainly on the larvae of wood-boring beetles which they can actually hear in the depths of the tree.  Their long bills allow them to reach deep under the bark to reach their prey.  Bloomingdale Bog has many reports of the woodpecker and it is also a good place to see other boreal species like Boreal Chickadee and Canada Jay.

A Canada Jay surveys the area

A Canada Jay surveys the area.

Derek and I spent all morning in this area on Wednesday.  It is nice easy birding with dirt roads and well-maintained wide trails.  We were not successful with our search for Black-backed Woodpecker, but we thoroughly enjoyed birding this area.  We saw Canada Jays and other northern breeding birds – Sharp-shinned Hawk, Broad-winged Hawk, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Hermit Thrush, and Black-capped Chickadees.

Canadian Bunchberry, a member of the dogwood family, was abundant along the roadsides in the bog

Canadian Bunchberry, a member of the dogwood family, was abundant along the roadsides in the bog.

We also saw pretty Bottle Gentian along the roadsides

We also saw pretty Bottle Gentian along the roadsides.

Canada Jays may be one of my favorite birds; they certainly rank high on the list of birds that are fun.  These jays are naturally inquisitive, but 20 years of hand feeding at Bloomingdale Bog has resulted in especially tame birds.  At this location, Canada Jays will eat out of your hand.  Here is Derek with an offering of raisins, a favorite food of the jays.

Offering accepted

Offering accepted

After we finished playing with the Canada Jays, we headed north on the trail towards a small wetland. We ran into our first warbler wave of the day, which was a mixed flock of birds ranging from Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatches to a Nashville Warbler, Blue-headed Vireos, and Magnolia Warblers.

We then had a quick lunch and checked out nearby Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC).  The hiking trails were gorgeous.

Along the Boreal Trail at Paul Smith's Visitor Interpretive Center

Along the Boreal Trail at Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

An interesting woodland wildflower we saw there was Indian Pipe, also called Ghost Pipe or Ghost Plant, which grows in mature moist shaded forests throughout most of North America.  This plant is unusual in that it is entirely white and able to survive without the green pigment chlorophyll.  Instead of generating energy from sunlight, it is parasitic.  Its hosts are certain fungi that are mycorrhizal with tree roots.

Indian Pipe

Indian Pipe

The Boreal Trail at Paul Smith’s VIC leads to a lovely bog where we saw Pitcher Plants.

Pitcher Plant, Sarracenia purpurea, at the VIC

Pitcher Plant, Sarracenia purpurea, at the VIC

The friendly folks at the VIC identified several wildflowers that Derek photographed.  We enjoyed chatting with them before and after our walks about the local birds, plants, and the Adirondacks and found them very helpful.

Derek and I really liked this area of the Adirondacks and we were happy that we would have two and a half more days here.

Red squirrel at Paul Smith's Visitor Interpretive Center

Red squirrel at Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

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