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Posts Tagged ‘Indian Pipe’

Black-backed Woodpecker is one of the most highly desired birds in the Adirondacks.  These woodpeckers are boreal specialists with most of their range in Canada.  They feed mainly on the larvae of wood-boring beetles which they can actually hear in the depths of the tree.  Their long bills allow them to reach deep under the bark to reach their prey.  Bloomingdale Bog has many reports of the woodpecker and it is also a good place to see other boreal species like Boreal Chickadee and Canada Jay.

A Canada Jay surveys the area

A Canada Jay surveys the area.

Derek and I spent all morning in this area on Wednesday.  It is nice easy birding with dirt roads and well-maintained wide trails.  We were not successful with our search for Black-backed Woodpecker, but we thoroughly enjoyed birding this area.  We saw Canada Jays and other northern breeding birds – Sharp-shinned Hawk, Broad-winged Hawk, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Hermit Thrush, and Black-capped Chickadees.

Canadian Bunchberry, a member of the dogwood family, was abundant along the roadsides in the bog

Canadian Bunchberry, a member of the dogwood family, was abundant along the roadsides in the bog.

We also saw pretty Bottle Gentian along the roadsides

We also saw pretty Bottle Gentian along the roadsides.

Canada Jays may be one of my favorite birds; they certainly rank high on the list of birds that are fun.  These jays are naturally inquisitive, but 20 years of hand feeding at Bloomingdale Bog has resulted in especially tame birds.  At this location, Canada Jays will eat out of your hand.  Here is Derek with an offering of raisins, a favorite food of the jays.

Offering accepted

Offering accepted

After we finished playing with the Canada Jays, we headed north on the trail towards a small wetland. We ran into our first warbler wave of the day, which was a mixed flock of birds ranging from Black-capped Chickadees and Red-breasted Nuthatches to a Nashville Warbler, Blue-headed Vireos, and Magnolia Warblers.

We then had a quick lunch and checked out nearby Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC).  The hiking trails were gorgeous.

Along the Boreal Trail at Paul Smith's Visitor Interpretive Center

Along the Boreal Trail at Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

An interesting woodland wildflower we saw there was Indian Pipe, also called Ghost Pipe or Ghost Plant, which grows in mature moist shaded forests throughout most of North America.  This plant is unusual in that it is entirely white and able to survive without the green pigment chlorophyll.  Instead of generating energy from sunlight, it is parasitic.  Its hosts are certain fungi that are mycorrhizal with tree roots.

Indian Pipe

Indian Pipe

The Boreal Trail at Paul Smith’s VIC leads to a lovely bog where we saw Pitcher Plants.

Pitcher Plant, Sarracenia purpurea, at the VIC

Pitcher Plant, Sarracenia purpurea, at the VIC

The friendly folks at the VIC identified several wildflowers that Derek photographed.  We enjoyed chatting with them before and after our walks about the local birds, plants, and the Adirondacks and found them very helpful.

Derek and I really liked this area of the Adirondacks and we were happy that we would have two and a half more days here.

Red squirrel at Paul Smith's Visitor Interpretive Center

Red squirrel at Paul Smith’s Visitor Interpretive Center

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