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Posts Tagged ‘Pelagic’

My first pelagic trip was off Hatteras, North Carolina, in 2008.  I used a Scopolamine patch and expected that it would completely prevent seasickness.  I threw up off and on for most of the 12-hour trip.  It took a couple of years for that memory to fade enough that I was willing to try again.  My next opportunity was in 2010 as part of the Oregon Shorebird Festival.  I had decided that maybe I was allergic to Scopolamine I had also read that getting seasick is partly psychological.   The Oregon trip would only be 5 hours, so I signed up, confidently optimistic that I would not be sick.  That trip was worse than the first.  I threw up constantly for 4 of the 5 hours; I wanted to die.  After another 2 years to recover, I decided to try again in Florida.  This time the trip would be on a 100-foot boat in July, the calmest month of the year.  I consulted with my doctor and she prescribed the Scop patch, Meclizine, and Zofran.  I bought ginger capsules, ginger cookies and candied ginger.  So, once again I optimistically got on a boat to search for birds.  And this time I was fine for the entire 18-hour trip.  I got 5 life birds, but not getting sick was the real thrill of the trip.

My first stop on the drive to Florida was Savannah NWR.  This cooperative Purple Gallinule walked right up to my car.

Purple Gallinule

Purple Gallinule

My late husband, Burt, called Purple Gallinules “Lipstick birds.”  Seeing these birds, one of his favorites, brought back wonderful memories of birding with Burt in the Florida Everglades in the early 1980’s.  I enjoyed watching the birds, especially the family with several small chicks.

Purple Gallinule chicks

Purple Gallinule chicks

The highlight at Savannah, however, was two Common Nighthawks flying together shortly before dark.  I watched for over 10 minutes as the birds swooped and soared over a large field intermittently peenting.  They did not appear to be foraging; they appeared to be having fun.  They flew side by side, then one bird would get ahead and the other would hurry to catch up.  Occasionally they would fly a little circle around each other.  A choreographed dance could not have been more beautiful.  I have no idea if I was watching two males or a male and female.  I don’t know if this was common behavior or if I witnessed something very special.  I only know that I was mesmerized by the beauty of the nighthawks on a peaceful summer evening.

I saw Painted Buntings, Least Bitterns, and other great birds at Savannah, Harris Neck, and Merritt Island NWRs and Viera Wetlands.  The trip ended on a high note with more swooping and soaring over a pasture in Brantley County, Georgia, where I was privileged to witness foraging kites.  I had previously seen many Swallow-tailed Kites, but seeing a large group feeding at close range was a totally different and amazing experience.  The birders who were there when I arrived estimated that there had been 60 Swallow-tailed Kites earlier, but there still at least 20 kites when I got there.  I watched the kites for nearly an hour and then I drove the rest of the way home, tired but happy and satisfied with all the wonderful birds that I had seen during my 5-day trip.

Swallow-tailed Kites

Swallow-tailed Kites

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